New film products

Early December Ilford announced two new disposable cameras with their black and white film, one with HP5, the other with XP2.

Strangely, disposable cameras still sell well in comparison, and Ilford is just trying to capitalize on this. There is a version with processing included for the HP5 film as it is traditional B&W. The XP2 film can be processed anywhere as it is C-41 process.

End of January, Lomography announced the LomoChrome Purple, a colour negative film design to achieve effects similar to the long discontinued Kodak EIR inversible film. The 35mm version is already sold out, but the 120 will cost you around $60 for a five pack, on pre-order.

It is good to see new niche product like these or like the Fujifilm Baby box.

Home C-41 color negative film processing

Pixelogist talk about Developing C-41 Color Negative Film explain how simply it can be done at home.

Alright, developing C-41 is pretty similar to the black and white process. The equipment is the same, so just check out my previous post on developing equipment to know what you will need. All of it applies – developing tank, beakers, thermometer, timer – all that. The chemistry is different but again, there’s developer, there’s fixer, and there’s something afterwards. The process, while different in order and times, is also very similar to the black and white process, so if you’ve worked black and white before, you should have no trouble with C-41.

My take: it might be harder to obtain the chemicals than to actually do it.

Kodachrome 2010

A small documentary “Kodachrome 2010” by Xander Robin, with an interview of Dwayne’s Photo lab manager and how it came to an end.

The video was taken down on YouTube due to a copyright claim.

Robert Cohen found his last roll of Kodachrome and went to the Missouri fair to shoot it ; then drove down to Dwayne’s to get it processed, anxiously waiting to see if the film had any picture on it.

My biggest regret is to not have shot Kodachrome more often. I think that the 3 weeks turn around in France was part of what turned me off.

Goodbye Kodachrome

Kodachrome is dead, long live to Kodachrome.

Yesterday, December 30th 2010, was the last day to have Kodachrome processed at the last lab operating in the world, Dwayne’s Photo, in Parsons Kansas. Rolls had to reach them by noon that day to be processed, after 75 years.

Steve McCurry, the legendary photographer from the National Geographic got given by Kodak the last roll they produced in 2009. You can see shots from his last roll.

It is sad to see this happening, but ever falling sales of film made the enterprise even less viable. I just wish there was a company that was able to manufacture and process a Kodachrome-like film in the future, as it was the best color slide film, with unbelievable archival quality, unrivaled by the E-6 chemistry based slide films.

I just regret to not have shot enough of it, none of them in America.