Thorsten Overgaard review of the Leica Q

Danish photographer Thorsten Overgaard has a very comprehensive review on the Leica Q (from May 2015). A camera not without quirks though:

I must say the Auto Focus caused me a few problems at f/1.7 in that I some times unknowingly had been focusing at the background between two main subjects in the foreground that I thought I had nailed the focus on. As time has gone by, I have gotten the hang of it. I think.

Then Overgaard goes on explaining how to use various features of the camera properly. Read thoroughly if you have a Leica Q, or are simply curious.

Craig Mod reviews the Leica Q

In 2010, Craig Mod wrote the GF1 field test — 16 Days in the Himalayas, a very compelling essay advocating Micro4/3 cameras, with the Panasonic GF1 and the 20mm f1.7. And what a gorgeous location. Later in November he wrote Seeing prime, an essay reviewing the Lumix 14mm f.2.5 and photography with a prime lens.

The in December 2013, not necessarily and change of heart but more like evidence of the shift of the whole industry Cameras, Goodbye where the iPhone quality reach the one of bigger cameras that don’t have the online features — something that the author found important. A testimonial about camera phones, with the iPhone spearheading, taking over the compact camera market.

Then come his essay The Leica Q where he took the Leica Q on a field test for six month:

I now understand the limitations of this photographic instrument, of which there are few. And I trust and enjoy it more than any other camera I’ve owned.

Yes, even more than my iPhone.

Read the whole essay — six month of use in the field is quite long enough to have a definitive opinion. It feels that Leica managed to make an attractive camera priced not too insanely above of the Sony RX1 (+ EVF to compare). This echoes quite well the early reviews back in June.

Sony DSC-RX1 Review

James Duncan Davidson reviews the Sony RX1. Gorgeous pictures, very nice website layiout.

His conclusion:

As of February 2013, this camera sets the bar for all compact digital cameras to meet. Finally, after thousands of words, only two more are needed: Highly recommended.

I still believe this camera is too expensive as the full frame sensor is not needed: they could have pulled it with an APS-C sensor and a smaller dedicated lens with a lower price ; and the nickel and diming of not having a battery charger. Not for me, but for the rest I’ll trust the review.

X-Pro1 reviews

Fuji X-Pro1 reviews are starting to appear.

Japan Camera hunter ask whether the Fuji X-Pro1 is the first real consumer rangefinder or not.

It could be said that this site has a bias towards film cameras, but that is not entirely true. I just don’t often find digital cameras that I like. Until now….

It should be noted also that:

Let’s just be clear though….This is not actually a rangefinder camera. It is a rangefinder ‘style’ camera. This is a mirrorless digital camera and is not actually using a rangefinder system.

Nonetheless the question raised is whether the X-Pro1 can replace a rangefinder cameras. The X-100 seems to be making people happy.

Then Zack Arias who loved his X-100 got offered to test the X-Pro1.

… as I unboxed it I think I said OMG 26 times in a row.

And he did. See his series on Dubai 01, 02, 03, 04.

Last but not least. Roel was lucky to get a sample on loan by Fujifilm and got a First Look at the X-Pro1:

Fujifilm claimed that they would get full frame sensor quality out of a compact camera when they announced the X-Pro1. I believe that they have largely achieved that goal.

Image quality on overall has to rock if you want to satisfy rangefinder users. The current samples look promising.

I can’t wait to get mine.

The Online Photographer: Shooting with a Fuji X100

The Online Photographer has a guest post by Robert Plotkin: Shooting with a Fuji X100.

Plotkin has a lots of gripes against the focusing system:

The imprecise focusing takes an unusually long time. It is like waiting for a cashier to incorrectly manipulate an abacus and hand you the wrong change.

He also have issues with the usability. But in the end:

Shooting the Fuji X100 is like driving a vintage Ferrari: bugs in your teeth, pebbles ricocheting off your goggles, double-clutching straight cut gears, applying opposite lock to correct a slide—and coming out of the corner neck-and-neck with a soccer mom in a black Escalade of an SLR.

Read it thoroughly. I still want to get one.