Buck the Nonexistent Photo Guild

James Duncan Davidson has a lengthy post Buck the Nonexistent Photo Guild about how photography for money has changed, mostly driven by technology.

One of the constant messages in photoblog circles is “Don’t work for free!” There are a bunch of arguments for this, from the formal to the informal, but they all pretty much boil down to the fear that if the market is served by others who undercut your prices, they’re reducing the amount of money you can make.

Photography for a living isn’t dead. It is just different, sometime harder because it is more accessible than ever, with cameras that makes things easier to learn and do, digital the make shot virtually costless, the Internet that allow spreading all of this knowledge even more widely.

Getting to know the face behind the photograph

Phaidon has an article about this Famous photographer portraits series I linked previously.

It all started with.

“I really missed the tactile nature of shooting large format and wanted to try a 20×24 Polaroid camera for fun and get back to something old school.”

Relationship between the photographer and his medium or tool did catalyst the start of the project.

Vivian Maier

On Mother Jones: The Best Street Photographer You’ve Never Heard Of:

Four years ago, a Chicago real estate agent stumbled upon a box of negatives. Little did he know that he’d discovered Vivian Maier

See alsoThe Secret City of Vivian Maier.

Vivian Maier was still living at the time of the purchase, Maloof didn’t know, nor did he know what her name was until he dug more in the archives. Only recently her work started being shown after being cataloged and processed.

It is the ordinary story of a nanny that filmed, photographed and documented life. She was a private person and seen through her passionate eyes we discover New York and Chicago in the 50’s and onward.

About the Maloof Collection:

The vast scope of the archive is impressive. It consists of more than 100,000 negatives, over 3,000 prints, hundreds of rolls of film, home movies, audio tape interviews, and various other items, representing roughly 90 percent of Vivian’s work.

The success of strobist

From Slate:

David Hobby
A Baltimore Sun photographer who took a buyout, started a blog, and changed the photography business forever.

David Hobby is behind the famous Strobist that teach people how to use lighting in photography. The article explains how this transformed the industry by making stock photography more accessible. Whether it is good or bad is a different question…

Losses in Libya

Today, in Misrata, Libya, two photographers were killed and two other were wounded. This should remind us how these men and women put their life at risk to bring us images of what is happening around the world, to show us how people fight for their freedom or for other’s. They’ll be missed and may they not be forgotten.

From the Denver Post :

British-born Tim Hetherington, co-director of the documentary “Restrepo” about U.S. soldiers on an outpost in Afghanistan, was killed inside the only rebel-held city in western Libya, said his U.S.-based publicist, Johanna Ramos Boyer. The city has come under weeks of relentless shelling by government troops.

Hetherington tweeted Tuesday: “In besieged Libyan city of Misrata. Indiscriminate shelling by Qaddafi forces. No sign of NATO.”

Chris Hondros, a New York-based photographer for Getty Images, was seriously injured and was on a respirator at Hikma Hospital. Doctors told The Associated Press that his condition was critical.

The two other photographers – Guy Martin, a Briton working affiliated with the Panos photo agency, and Michael Christopher Brown – were treated for shrapnel wounds, doctors said.

and from the New York Times

BENGHAZI, Libya — Tim Hetherington, a conflict photographer who was a director and producer of the Afghan war documentary “Restrepo,” was killed in the besieged city of Misurata, Libya, on Wednesday, and three photographers working beside him were wounded, one fatally, when they came under fire at the city’s front lines.

Chris Hondros of the Getty Images photo agency died later of devastating brain trauma.