Why I think the M6 is the best Leica rangefinder

Japan Camera Hunter (aka Bellamy Hunt) tells us why he think the M6 is the best Leica RF (digital shooters will disapprove).

I have been through a lot of cameras in my time, and I have owned a few different Leica bodies. I have also got the enviable position of being able to try out more cameras than you can shake a stick at, and I have come to a conclusion that may put a few noses out of joint.

I think that the Leica M6 is the best M-series analogue rangefinder camera that Leica ever made! Now that I have your attention let me explain myself.

Cultivating my Leica envy I have to agree with that specific point, now that we can get them for less than 1400$ on the used market (body only !), even though I am an aperture priority kind of guy. I wish I actually had one.

Leica M6, Summicron 50mm f2 Lens, Top view
Leica M6, Summicron 50mm f2 Lens, Top view by Shawn Hoke

Fujifilm X-E1 and al.

Fujifilm just announced the X-E1. Simply put, it is a cheaper version of the X-Pro1, without the optical-hybrid viewfinder, slightly shrunk down, albeit with a very similar design. In addition it has a popup flash next to the EVF. Engadget has a preview of the X-E1. The camera body only will be around $1000. Comes in silver or black.

As previously announced in the XF lens roadmap, the 18-55mm f/2.8-4 OIS zoom for the X- series will be available at the same time in November, standalone for $900 or as a kit with the X-E1 for $1400. The 14mm f/2.8 will also be available in November for $700.

The speed improvements in the X-E1 seems to have been rolled into the firmware 2.0 update that will be released September 18 for the X-Pro1 ; DPReview had the privilege to get their hands on the update.

While the X-E1 isn’t really for me, as I own a X-Pro1, it is very nice to see that Fujifilm seems to be committed to the system and release more than just one camera. By lowering the price point of the body, and catering to zoom users, they really want to expand their market. And this is good news.

Buck the Nonexistent Photo Guild

James Duncan Davidson has a lengthy post Buck the Nonexistent Photo Guild about how photography for money has changed, mostly driven by technology.

One of the constant messages in photoblog circles is “Don’t work for free!” There are a bunch of arguments for this, from the formal to the informal, but they all pretty much boil down to the fear that if the market is served by others who undercut your prices, they’re reducing the amount of money you can make.

Photography for a living isn’t dead. It is just different, sometime harder because it is more accessible than ever, with cameras that makes things easier to learn and do, digital the make shot virtually costless, the Internet that allow spreading all of this knowledge even more widely.